VLLG

Schwartzco / Kommissar

Schwartzco

Harrell Fletcher Local Gothic

Exhibition catalogue and poster design featuring Local Gothic

Harrell Fletcher (b. 1967, lives and works in Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.) is internationally renowned for facilitating exhibitions and events based on participation and collaboration, often with people who are usually not involved in making art. Fletcher spent a week in Melbourne during March of this year to meet potential participants for his project at the NGV.

Interior fold-out posters within the Harrell Fletcher catalogue

The participants — Arts Project Australia, CERES, Crooked Rib Art, Footscray Community Arts Centre, Grainger Museum, Hell Gallery, Herb Patten, RISE and Jeff Sparrow — each reveal an aspect of contemporary and historical Melbourne, whether it is immigration, art and community, identity, urban agriculture and sustainability, urban history and politics, and even music. In addition to reflecting a place’s past and present, the project is ultimately situated in an art gallery and Fletcher saw this as an opportunity to involve participants in selecting works from the NGV Collection.

Seattle Met magazine Giorgio Sans

A feature spread from the February 2013 issue

A charmingly illustrated spread typeset in a killer combination of Giorgio & Giorgio Sans, featuring the latter’s titling alternates. From Seattle Met magazine, a Sea-Tac feature. Where can you fly to from Sea-Tac airport?; design by Jane Sherman, illustration by Adam Hancher.

Inventing the Modern World Stag

Catalogue for the exhibition: Inventing the Modern World

The companion catalogue to Inventing the Modern World an exhibition showcasing artifacts collected from past World’s Fairs, by J. Busch and C. Futter. The designers, MGMT, write: ‘This book details decorative arts from the world’s fairs, ranging from woodwork, metalwork, ceramics, glass, jewelry, and textiles.’

Two spreads from Inventing the Modern World

Design in the Field Stag Stencil

A fold-out program designed by Working Format

Design in the Field is a two week summer design institute organized by Emily Carr University. The event brings together designers from a number of disciplines, engaging the general public with through an array of workshops and lectures.

The program guide folds out into a poster loosely inspired by early 20th century stencil typography. See more here.

Esquire Magazine Stag Sans Round

Stag Sans Round was the final extension of the Stag Superset, shown here in Esquire magzine

I never expected Stag to take on such a life of its own. It was originally intended to be a small, four weight slab family for headlines only, but the art staff at Esquire keep dreaming up new directions to push it in — first a sans, then a stencil, and now a rounded version of the sans.

Stag Sans Round in use in Esquire

Fast Company Kommissar

Florian Bachleda commissioned Kommissar for his redesign of Fast Company magazine

As part of his redesign of Fast Company, Florian Bachleda needed a condensed sans to complement the new general-purpose sans and slab families. Together, Florian and Christian Schwartz found a stripped down, flat-sided condensed sans in a German specimen book, with a distinctive ‘crotchless’ treatment for where the stems met the bowls in the lowercase. This family, called Vertikal and likely cut in the late 1920s, seemed to have some potential, but a quick digitization of a handful of characters showed that it was a little too dry and boring in layouts.

Florian and his design staff had come across the condensed styles of Paul Renner’s Plak, and asked if Christian and his design staff at Commercial Type might be able to synthesize a new condensed sans that had the distinctive traits of Vertikal, with no contrast and flat connections on the arches and bowls in characters like h m n r and a b d p q g; synthesized with the roundness and wandering uppercase crossbar heights of Plak. The Commercial Type designers figured out how to make this marriage of styles work, then expanded the family out to a full range of weights in three progressively narrower widths. In the heaviest weights, the family ended up with a taste of the future as predicted in the 1970s.

Fast Company Kommissar Condensed

Florian Bachleda commissioned Kommissar for his redesign of Fast Company magazine

As part of his redesign of Fast Company, Florian Bachleda needed a condensed sans to complement the new general-purpose sans and slab families. Together, Florian and Christian Schwartz found a stripped down, flat-sided condensed sans in a German specimen book, with a distinctive ‘crotchless’ treatment for where the stems met the bowls in the lowercase. This family, called Vertikal and likely cut in the late 1920s, seemed to have some potential, but a quick digitization of a handful of characters showed that it was a little too dry and boring in layouts.

Florian and his design staff had come across the condensed styles of Paul Renner’s Plak, and asked if Christian and his design staff at Commercial Type might be able to synthesize a new condensed sans that had the distinctive traits of Vertikal, with no contrast and flat connections on the arches and bowls in characters like h m n r and a b d p q g; synthesized with the roundness and wandering uppercase crossbar heights of Plak. The Commercial Type designers figured out how to make this marriage of styles work, then expanded the family out to a full range of weights in three progressively narrower widths. In the heaviest weights, the family ended up with a taste of the future as predicted in the 1970s.

Kommissar Styles

Kommissar Condensed is available in seven feature-rich weights in Roman only

Version history

V1.0—Initial release version; 2014.05

Esquire magazine Stag Sans

Stag Sans in Esquire magazine

Stag is packed full of distinctive details, so the trick in designing a companion sans was to pinpoint the right balance between the rounded terminals, which make it complimentary to the original Stag, and the blunt terminals, which give the family a no-nonsense muscularity. The end result is a sans that is interesting in headlines but not distracting at text sizes.

Fast Company Kommissar X-Condensed

Florian Bachleda commissioned Kommissar for his redesign of Fast Company magazine

As part of his redesign of Fast Company, Florian Bachleda needed a condensed sans to complement the new general-purpose sans and slab families. Together, Florian and Christian Schwartz found a stripped down, flat-sided condensed sans in a German specimen book, with a distinctive ‘crotchless’ treatment for where the stems met the bowls in the lowercase. This family, called Vertikal and likely cut in the late 1920s, seemed to have some potential, but a quick digitization of a handful of characters showed that it was a little too dry and boring in layouts.

Florian and his design staff had come across the condensed styles of Paul Renner’s Plak, and asked if Christian and his design staff at Commercial Type might be able to synthesize a new condensed sans that had the distinctive traits of Vertikal, with no contrast and flat connections on the arches and bowls in characters like h m n r and a b d p q g; synthesized with the roundness and wandering uppercase crossbar heights of Plak. The Commercial Type designers figured out how to make this marriage of styles work, then expanded the family out to a full range of weights in three progressively narrower widths. In the heaviest weights, the family ended up with a taste of the future as predicted in the 1970s.

Things Come Apart Stag Dot

Stag Dot Bold is creatively modified in this book

An inventive use of Stag Dot in Things Come Apart by Todd McLellan. The publisher writes: ‘This book makes visible the inner workings of some of the world’s most iconic designs. These disassembled objects show that even the most intricate of modern technologies can be broken down and understood, while beautifully illustrating the quality and elegance of older designs.’

Stag Dot is paired with Archer in this book

Typer / Dignitas

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